Back to Work: Where a Swim and a Sauna Becomes 150 Kettlebell Swings and Carb-Loading.

This post is going to be a little all over the place, just like me right now.

Part of my sanity-preservation as a solo-practice midwife in a high-service practice (read — I´m on call 24/7 and my phone rings and pings all day every day) is to take about 6-8 weeks off of call every summer so that I can rest, take a vacation or two, recharge, finally clean out all of my closets, and get my attitude on straight again.   For those of you not in small business this is otherwise known as two months unpaid leave. The last baby I delivered in my practice was on June 27.  Just got a call that let me know I will be back in the baby business later today because one of my clients is in early labor. Back to work.

I´ve switched my powerlifting training up a bit.  Right now, finances and time dictate that if I´m going to powerlift it´s going to be with either a self-designed program or with some kind of out-of the box online program.  I had started with Starting Strength, and had beautiful, glorious, newbie gains with it but they have slowed down a bit now that I´m about six months in .  That´s to be expected — I started this process with an ok fitness base and I had lifted before in high school, so my form wasn´t too far off.  

What I need now in order to make progress, I think, is some hypertrophy training, so my next out-of-the-box training program is going to be Juggernaut.  I really like the idea of working with a little bit more volume (when I add in some assistance exercises) and it feels better to work with a sub-maximal load and be making lots of lifts until I can´t work any more instead of trying to hit a new max every session and failing on my first or second or third rep.  Also, things that do need technical help, like my squats, get lots of reps in this phase to practice with under reasonable loads (exhibit A, my Tuesday workout with 50 squats at 85lbs.)

So, Juggernaut has one main lift a day for four days a week and then has assistance exercises worked in. For right now I´m being really flexible with those as my body feels heavily fatigued or tweaked by new loads.  Tuesday´s workout was just the squats.  Thursday I thought I´d bench press and then do some lower-body assistance stuff like leg presses and turkish get-ups.  

One other thing that this means is that my workouts are on a different schedule than the rest of the family, so I´m moving them to the mornings and then tagging along with them and doing easy stuff while they are at the gym.  13 loves to swim and has been pretty consistent about it, so I´ve been hopping in the pool while he´s there.

It feels good to swim again.  You can dig through the archives for a post about my complicated feelings about swimming, but a few more trips to the pool and I am almost exclusively positive about it right now.  

When I was a teenager and swimming 3-5 hours a day I had killer hip mobility which translated very nicely to ballet class and impressing people in yoga.  One of the things that I hope will come back with more frequent swim workouts is mobility in my right hip.  It has been limiting my martial arts progress for a bit and I´m hoping that a few hundred thousand yards of breaststroke will work the rust out.

Circling back to our headline, though — the one bad thing about swimming is that I haven´t worked out a low-tech, low-cost way to be connected to my phone.  So now that I´ve got a baby lined up on the runway,  I can´t go to the pool.  Even sadder, I can´t go to the sauna.  

I´ve developed a small addiction to the sauna, which is ironic, because in real life I absolutely hate being hot.  But the sauna is like a big, fat reset button for my brain chemistry (this is backed by research) and also seems to help me recover from my workouts better.  Plus my skin loves it and, well, vanity.

So, I´m chasing my workout and baking endorphins by doing some kettlebell swings today.  I´m completely overjoyed to report that swinging a 30-lb bell feels way too light now, so I´ve moved up to the 50.  Whoa.  I can’t quite manage it for 200 swings in a row yet, but I´m cranking out sets of 25 while unloading my dishwasher, touching up my toenail polish, eating rice and hot sauce, and whatever else I´m supposed to be doing when I´m going to work in an indeterminate amount of hours and have no idea when I will finish and come home.

For my personal reference and your curiosity, this is what I´m doing these days:

Monday — rest day

Tuesday — lift, martial arts class, easy swim or stretch, sauna

Wednesday — easy swim, sauna

Thursday — lift, easy swim or stretch, sauna

Friday — lift, sauna

Saturday — martial arts class

Sunday, martial arts class, lift

This feels good right now and even though it looks like a lot, I´m enjoying it.

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Swimming — Slaying my Fat Unicorn

I did a swimming workout yesterday.  I think, overall, I swam about 1500 yards in somewhere around 40 minutes, in intervals, with a lot of chatting at the end of the pool and screwing around in between.  I love to swim in the ocean, in Great Lakes, and in pools messing around with my kids.  I have not one but two scuba diving trips scheduled with 13 this summer.  We’re diving shipwrecks in Tobermory and off the coast in Key West.  

But swimming for exercise has been something that overwhelms me.  I swam competitively in high school.  Very competitively.  I trained with people who became Olympians, I went to national competitions, I trained six days a week for up to five hours a day.  

And then one day, I just stopped.  I decided I wanted a normal teenage life.  I quit right after I turned 17 and didn’t do another pool workout, well, until yesterday, nearly 30 years later.

Last summer I tried.  I bought a summer-long membership to the masters swim club and then sat on it and didn’t go to a single practice.  I think that being in the group and facing how slow I would be, how weak I had become, was just too big of a demon to slay.  When I was thinking rationally, it seemed pretty logical to assume that I wouldn’t be the first person who had ever participated in a masters sport who had once been really good at something and then somehow gotten old and fat in the decades that followed.  

I think that one of the things that I was really self-conscious about was sharing a lane.  if you are swimming two or three or four people to a lane in a practice and you are a lot slower than everyone else, you get in their way.  It isn’t the same as running in a group and falling behind — you’re actively creating a traffic jam.  And somehow, some kind of body shame around being fat and out of shape was really getting in the way of me occupying my own space and claiming my right to not be fantastic at this on the first day.

Let’s call it the Fat Unicorn Syndrome.  Fat athletes are assumed to be slow and low-skill at their sports.  Lots of people are slow and low-skill at their sports.  Example A, approximately half of my softball team last summer, most of them young and skinny.  I didn’t have much self-worth invested in that — I signed up for the beer.  Fat Unicorns, though, break the rules, by achieving great physical feats despite their fatness. They run half-marathons, crush the Athena class in the triathlons, find their way onto the crew boats, do the multi-day bike trips, etc.  

I totally struggle with participating in a new venture unless I can be a Fat Unicorn.  Especially if I’m on a team or in a group practice where my incompetence affects others.  The truth is that unless we are going to spend the rest of our lives not trying new things, we are going to do things that we are bad at.  I spent the first two years of my martial arts career trying not to fall over, but now that I’m nearly five years in, I’m training for my black belt.  But I think that for some of us fat athletes, there is this extra internal mental pressure. “If I am not instantly excellent at this, people are going to assume it is because of my fatness, and they are also going to assume that I will never be good at it.”  And the heavy weight of people’s low expectations gets in your own head and sets up barriers that certainly seem real.

Stopping swimming for me is absolutely connected to my weight gain in my mind.  I ate like a swimmer when I was actively competing — probably 6000-7000 calories a day.  I was constantly hungry and ate a ton of crap.  So when I stopped, the weight just piled on.  It took me a good ten years to figure out what healthy eating looked like and that helped me stabilize — at about 240 lbs.  So, not doing swimming is tied closely in my mind with “letting myself go,” and with every bit of shame and regret I have about being heavy.  I’m working on those feelings.

But I swam yesterday.  And because I’ve been powerlifting, I had some new core strength and stability that I haven’t had recently.  My heart was pounding after just a few laps, but I didn’t feel that kind of deep exhaustion or weakness or instability that you feel when you try something new and your body isn’t quite ready for it.  It felt, well, just fine.  And I swam on my own time, in a lane with somebody about my speed, then later with 13, who is markedly slower than me.  But I like to think that I made space for him too, to figure out his own pace, his own distance, and his own skill.  We’ll keep going, at least until we hit the shipwrecks this summer.